The “Preuxfessional” Has Arrived.

As the years have gone by, when it comes to fashion in the workplace, each generation of workers has become more and more relaxed. No longer is the suit and tie, or traditional dresses the norm for people to wear at the office. Dress codes have become much more casual, to the point where even athleisure fashion has found its way into the workplace.

Along with this relaxation in dress codes, comes a need for a more versatile wardrobe. Today’s young generation of workers prefer a modern fit, a little more color, and something they can feel comfortable using at the office, on the green, and during a night out on the town. However, because many companies are filled with employees from old generations and new, it can be challenging to find a suitable uniform that everyone can feel good about wearing.

Enter Prim + Preux. A new brand ready to tackle this exact problem, with a line of apparel made to satisfy the tastes of young workers and help the older generation look a little more modern in something they can feel comfortable wearing. Here’s a quick look at what the collection has to offer.

Continue reading “The “Preuxfessional” Has Arrived.”

Work With Your Fashion Tee. Not Against It.

Do you want to sell more fashion tees, but haven’t had much success getting the right printing results when using them? Are you defaulting to selling basic cotton tees as a result? The problem could be that you’re working against your garment, and not with it. Times have changed and the “one style fits all” approach to screen printing just doesn’t cut it anymore. What works on basic 6.0 oz./ 100% cotton tees doesn’t necessarily work on lightweight fashion fabrics like 3.7 oz triblends or 4.2 oz 100% ringspun cotton. So what’s the difference?

Basic T-shirt Printing vs Fashion T-shirt Printing

Think of the 6.0 oz basic shirt as a really thick paper towel. Because of it’s heavier weight and rough surface, it can absorb a thicker layer of ink. On the other end of spectrum, the 3.7 oz triblend shirt is like a thin tissue that can’t absorb the same amount of ink. 

When printing on a 6.0 oz shirt, a coarse mesh like 110 is used to lay down a thick opaque layer of ink. If we looked through a loop and magnified the surface of a basic 6.0 oz cotton tee, the cotton fibers have a rough texture that looks like a bale of hay (see the “Carded Open End Cotton” image on the left). Because of this, it’ll require a thicker layer of ink deposited onto it for you to get a fully opaque print. Otherwise, much of the ink will fall in between the fibers, since there isn’t a smooth, tightly knitted surface for it to be evenly distributed on.

Image from article “Fabric Type 101: Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know” @ bellacanvas.com

Using this same thick stencil technique wouldn’t be as effective on a 30 singles combed ringspun cotton shirt, though. Why? The tighter weave (see the “100% Combed & Ringspun” image on the right) allows the ink to easily sit on top of the fabric and be evenly distributed across the surface of the shirt. A thick layer of ink on top of a shirt like this will feel heavy and rough. The ink will rise off of it and defeat the whole purpose of using a softer fabric in the first place.

Why pay extra money for a soft fashion tee if you’re going to apply a thick, sandpaper-like design on it, taking away from its softness? It’s like putting cloth seats in an expensive luxury car. It just doesn’t match the product. Offer your clients decoration techniques that best compliment the garment.

The Right Tee For The Right Job

When your customer wants an opaque bold logo on a fashion tee, go with a 100% cotton ringspun tee. If they’re looking for a vintage look, with distressed artwork or logos, use blended heathered or blended solid tees. These work best because the texture of these fabrics can be blended into the artwork, helping to emphasize that vintage style.

Looking to #print a bold opaque logo on a fashion #tee, go with a 100% cotton ringspun tee. For a #vintage style, with #distressed artwork or logos, use blended heathered or blended solid tees. Click To Tweet

The Right Ink For The Right Job

Below is a list of inks, along with how and when the best time to use them is:

For Printing On 100% Combed Ringspun Cotton Fashion Tees:

Regular Plastisol Ink – When using this kind of ink, simply use a higher mesh count like 156 or 195 and add reducer to it, so it’ll to thin out a bit. (Keep in mind once you go over 10%, it will start to affect your ink color) 

Plastisol Discharge Ink – Great technique for achieving bright whites that have very little hand, but can be a little chalky when it dries, compared to water-based discharge ink.    

Water Based Ink – Good for creating a tone-on-tone print, when using light colored tees and it also has the softest hand of any print technique.

Water Based Discharge Ink – The discharge agent bleaches the dye of the cotton and replaces it with the pigment of the ink. This provides a much softer hand then a traditional plastisol under base on dark garments. Discharge agent only works on cotton though, so the garment will need to be 100% cotton for a fully opaque print.              

For Printing On Fashion Tees w/ Blended Heathers or Blended Solid Fabric:

Water-Based Ink – Works well on lighter colors for a washed-out tone-on-tone look. The ink blends in with the heathered coloring of the fabric, which makes it feel like part of the shirt.    

Fashion Based Ink – Best way to achieve the same super-soft hand as water-based ink does, but still gives you the ability to use plastisol ink and avoid using water based ink, if you’re not comfortable working with it.

Water-Based Discharge Ink – Great for tri–blends that contain cotton/poly/rayon only. The pigment in the cotton will be affected by the discharge, which produces a very vintage “washed out” look. 

Jason Peters

Jason is an Account Executive at S&S and has over 20 years of experience in the decorated apparel industry. These days he really enjoys using the knowledge he's gained throughout the years to help other industry professionals succeed.
Jason Peters

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Photo of Screen Printer Taken by yanalya / Freepik

cotton

ComfortWash: Supporting the U.S. Economy and the Environment

Have you ever considered how agriculture and fashion are so intrinsically connected? Farmers grow the materials that go into the textiles, and thus they’re the foundation of every fashionable piece you see online or in a store.

Take cotton, for example. Textile manufacturers in the U.S. use an average of 7.6 million bales of cotton each year. As a leading cash crop, it aids in stimulating the American economy and provides significant environmental benefits.

Are you ready to start supporting the local economy and environment? Here’s why you should consider working more with brands who choose material grown in the U.S.

The Impact of U.S. Cotton

Growing the Economy

Of the thousands of cotton growers in America, many are family-owned farms whose rural communities depend on stable farm income. In fact, the crop is responsible for employing over 126,000 people and bringing in more than $120 billion in business revenue for the U.S. annually. Of the total annual yield, more than half is used for apparel!

Continue reading “ComfortWash: Supporting the U.S. Economy and the Environment”